FPAN Central ~ 2015 Summer Newsletter!

 FPAN Central Region, 2015 Summer Newsletter link is below. Lots of good stuff in this edition!

  July2015_Newsletter_final_Page_1 - Summer Camp Recap
- CRC – In Focus: Summer Happenings
- History Bike Gainesville! 
- Etna Turpentine Camp!
- New Volunteer Coordinator at CRPSP
- Recipes: Pan Seared Scallops

Follow the link below for the Newsletter!

Click Here for FPAN Central 2015 Summer Newsletter

Make your own concrete vernacular headstone!

This vernacular headstone project was originally supposed to take place during the Cemetery Resource Protection Training Conference (CRPTC) in DeLand this past June. Unfortunately, due to bad weather, making the stone during the conference was not possible, and I had to settle with a brief presentation of the process. The video above, along with the description below, illustrates a simple tutorial on how to pour your very own concrete grave marker!

The term vernacular is regularly used in connection with language and architecture; it refers to locally-spoken dialects and architecture that has developed from local traditions, with emphasis on specific cultural characteristics. However, the term can be used more broadly than that. Its use in connection to grave markers generally suggests the maker is an untrained craftsperson expressing local cultural traditions. Often these handmade markers are made using easily accessible and low cost materials such as concrete. Though vernacular headstones often seem crude and unsophisticated amongst stones made of finer materials such as granite and marble, they can be a window into local traditions and provide unseen information about specific cultural aspects such as socio-economic conditions within a community. Gordon Bond with the NCPTT (National Center for Preservation Technology and Training) discussed vernacular grave markers at the 2014 International Cemetery Preservation Summit in New York.

We’ve found that we can categorize a folk grave marker as having been created by hand by someone who normally does not make grave markers as a profession. The maker may have been skilled or unskilled in working with the materials used. The marker must have been intended as a permanent monument and be on the actual grave. This differentiates them from temporary markers or monuments placed where death occurred, such as with roadside memorials. The marker had to be created at a time and place where the option of a professionally-made commercial marker was readily available, therefore making it an intentional choice to make one by hand. (http://ncptt.nps.gov/blog/made-from-my-own-hand-an-introduction-to-concrete-grave-markers/)

1.Build a frame or mold for your concrete.

It isn’t necessary to purchase new wood for your mold. If you have scrap wood lying around, use that! Be sure your mold has a solid plywood backing, especially if you’re working on a concrete driveway. You do not want to pour your headstone directly on the ground or you might have to rearrange where you plan to be buried. Always use screws when assembling your frame so you can take it apart easily.

2.Pour the concrete.

Depending on your use of the stone, whether for Halloween props or your actual final resting place, materials will vary. For the stone I made in the video, I used one 80-pound bag of mortar cement. A smooth cement with no added aggregate is key to ensuring your lettering is clear, legible, and easily carved. Follow the instructions on the bag for quantity of water to add to the powdered concrete. For best results, keep your mix on the drier side, like chunky peanut butter. As you can see in the video, I added a steel mesh screen to the mix in the middle of the pour which will strengthen the finished stone and help prevent cracking. Tapping the side of the frame with a rubber mallet will fill gaps and help settle the concrete mix in the frame.

3.Finish your stone.

While the concrete is still wet, take your trusty trowel and smooth the surface of the stone. This will be made easier when using the mortar cement without aggregate. When it comes to lettering there are many different options, from stamping to hand carving. If you stamp your letters, either keep them wet or spray lightly with cooking spray so the concrete doesn’t stick. Hand carving is always a good option; however, you need to plan. Placing strings across the stone to keep what you’re carving straight can be helpful. I printed my letters on paper, then lightly incised through the paper onto the stone and carved out the letters. Once your lettering is done, wait until the stone has cured, usually with 36 hours. Remove the frame, clean up any burs or jagged edges with the edge of your trowel, and your stone is complete.

 

FPAN Central Spring Newsletter!

 FPAN Central Region, Spring Newsletter link is below. Lots of good stuff in this edition.

  • FPAN_CRC_Spring_Newsletter_Page_1

- Florida Archaeology Month Recap
- CRC – In Focus: Rosewood
- Catching up with CRBB
- Estuary Exploration, Science Summer Camp!
- Recipes: Chainey Brier (Smilax) Salad
- CRPT Conference – Deland, FL

Follow the link below for the Newsletter!

Click Here for FPAN Central Spring Newsletter

Estuary Exploration: A Science Discovery Summer Camp 2015!

Estuary Exploration: A Science Discovery Summer Camp

July 6 – 10, 2015 / July 13 – 17, 2015

 

summer_camp_tshirtDates:

July 6 – 10, 2015 (8:30 am – 3:00 pm)

July 13 – 17, 2015 (8:30 am – 3:00 pm)

Ages: Children ages 7 – 11

Registration: $80.00/camper/week

 *Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. After-camp care is available from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm for an additional fee ($20.00) each week. 

GlassesGirlThe Friends of Crystal River State Parks, in partnership with the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN), Florida Park Service, Florida Coastal Office, Crystal River Boat Builders, and Gulf Archaeology Research Institute (GARI), is offering exciting new archaeology and biology summer camps at Crystal River Preserve State Park designed for students who are interested in applying archaeology and biology to explore the Parks within Crystal River. All camp activities are conducted by professional archaeologists and biologists, including educators from FPAN, and allow kids to experience archaeology and biology first-hand through activities, experiments, and hikes! 

How to Register

Complete registration and liability release forms are provided on the next page. Return via U.S. Postal Service along with a check or money order made out to “Friends of Crystal River State Parks” for the appropriate amount. We cannot accept cash or credit cards. Once the completed paperwork and payment have been received, we will provide a confirmation email along with other important information.

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION FORM

Mailing Address

Friends of Crystal River State Parks

ATTN: Summer Camp 2015

3266 N. Sailboat Avenue

Crystal River, FL 34428

Cancellation Policy

All cancellation requests must be received in writing or email and be postmarked no later than June 29th, 2015. No refunds will be made for cancellations received after that date. A $25.00 cancellation fee will be charged for all processed refunds.

For more information, or to register, please contact:

Jamie Letendre

Office: 352.563.0450

Email: Jamie.Letendre@dep.state.fl.us

 

Ethnoarchaeology and Gulf Coast Fishing Technology: An interview with Ginessa Mahar, PHD candidate in archaeology @ University of Florida

     Below is an excerpt from a lengthy interview I had originally planned to feature in the recent FPAN Central, Fall Newsletter. Due to space constraints when editing the newsletter, I thought a blog posting would be much more appropriate for such an in-depth conversation. I found Ginessa’s use of ethnoarchaeology to better understand pre-historic fishing technologies and coastal communities very interesting…hope you do to!

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After finishing an outreach event at Cedar Key Public Library this past summer, I stumbled on an archaeological dig going on in the yard of a historic house built on a small midden along the Gulf. There I met Ginessa Mahar, PHD candidate in archaeology from the University of Florida. We chatted briefly about the work she was doing; her dissertation is focused on prehistoric fishing technologies employed along the Florida Gulf Coast, specifically the small islands of  North Key, Seahorse Key, and Snake Key located off Cedar Key.

What I found most intriguing was her method of research, integrating both archaeological and ethnographic approaches. By working with current fishing communities along the Gulf coast, Ginessa is hoping to “develop new models of fishing practices that can be used to better interpret the archaeological record regarding past human-environmental interactions along Florida’s coast.” (University of Florida, Laboratory of Southeastern Archaeology website). I had the opportunity to sit down with Ginessa and talk more about her work.

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Understanding the Nature Coast’s rich archaeological heritage, why did you pick Cedar Key to focus your research?  

I used to work for the Museum of Natural History in New York and our field project was on the Atlantic Coast in Georgia. I did my Master thesis there, ran their field projects. I’ve been a coastal archaeologist for close to a dozen years now. So I got here and started thinking about the “missing millennium,” that period between the late archaic and woodland (roughly 3,000 to 4,000 years ago).

So we [Mahar and Dr. Ken Sassaman] were thinking if that evidence is anywhere it would be on the Gulf Coast. We’re more likely to find it out there because of the gradual slope in coastal water depth. That was my initial focus, but then very quickly it became something else when I took a class in ethno-archaeology. I realized I enjoy talking to people. I can talk to them about sea level change and learn how it has affected their lives. There are a lot of folks out there that have seen entire islands disappear in their lifetime! But even more than that, I was better understanding their connections to traditional methods and lifeways associated with fishing.  I think that’s been a strong tradition for thousands of years across the planet! So I think research like this is applicable especially with the loss of fishing communities over time, for all kinds of different reasons.

So when I first decided to look at fishing on the gulf coast, because we have 5,000 years of people being fisher folk out there, I decided to start working with local community members to see how I could understand fishing in that particular area. So it really started as an ethnographic approach to archaeology. Let me see how people practice fishing and then maybe I can find reconstructions of that in the archaeological record. So if they were using nets or they were using weirs, hook and line, they (current fisherman) understand the fish and how they target different fish species.

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Will you please describe what a “fish-weir” is as opposed to cast-nets or other types of net?

A fish weir is a fish trap You can have a “tidal weir” where at high tide the fish can swim over the barrier, but at low tide they are trapped behind this barrier and confined in a place. So what you have done is lured the fish into a trap and then you can harvest them more easily. Mostly you can trap demersal or bottom dwelling fish that aren’t used to swimming up into the water column, fish like flounder, sheepshead, or other small demersal fishes with a tidal weir.

Then there’s another kind of weir called a “long-shore weir” that’s constructed by having a leader or a fence that comes out perpendicular from the shoreline. That leader goes into deeper water and at the end of it there’s a heart-shaped pod, where again the fish will swim down the leader and into the trap. For this kind of weir, it’s dependent on fish behavior. Schooling fish will swim into the trap and just perpetually swim around in circles. They won’t know that the entrance is also the exit. Then at low tide you can go and harvest them.

We know through ethnohistorical accounts that there is documentation by Spanish explorers of evidence of fish weirs being constructed out of limestone cobbles. In south Florida there’s word that the Calusa made them out of heaps and piles of oyster shells. So essentially the fish come to you, it’s a more passive fishing method.

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Do you think the “fisher folk” you’ve worked with on Cedar Key had an understanding of the archaeology of the area?

The people that I work with out in Cedar Key, it took them a little while to believe I was an archaeologist because I would just be asking questions all the time about what they do fishing. They were wondering what that had to do with anything. But I think now they get it. They seem to have a sense or a pride or connection with Native Americans that live there before them because they have such a love for that place. Especially when they start thinking that these weren’t just Native Americans wondering around in the woods, we’re talking about fisher people!

 

Fall Newsletter!

 

FPAN_Horiz

Greetings from FPAN – CRC!

Below you’ll find a link to our Fall newsletter. Hope you enjoy!
Inside this issue:

- Moving forward with Citrus County CLG (Certified Local Government)
- New park manager at Crystal River Parks
- Spirit On The Open Sea!
- Sifting For Technology gets a facelift! 

and much more!
Click on the link below for the newsletter!!!
FPAN CRC ~ Fall Newsletter

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FPAN CRC Summer Newsletter!

FPAN_Horiz
Greetings from FPAN Central Regional Center!
Hey y’all!
It’s newsletter time again! Click on the link below!
In this issue:
  • Moon Over The Mounds Opens
  • Crystal River Archaeological State Park Mural
  • Resurrecting The Reindeer: New model by the CRBB
  • Between Two Shells: Scallop Season, Past and Present
  • FPAN CRC Summer Library programs

Click Below!

FPAN CRC ~ SUMMER NEWSLETTER

 

Crystal River Archaeological State Park Mural Project

 

Friends of Crystal River State Parks, along with the Florida Park Service, Florida Department of Environmental Protection, Florida Public Archaeology Network, and Gulf Archaeological Research Institute, is commissioning a mural to be painted at the Crystal River Archaeological State Park. The scene will be depicting “a day in the life” of the native people who once lived at the site.  Please click on the link below to download all the pertinent information. The Mural Packet includes a prospectus with important dates, description of location of the mural within the museum, and several archaeological interpretations of the site prehistorically to help guide the artist with content. Though the artist is free to render the scene as he or she envisions it to be, the packet helps to clarify specific aspects of the landscape, people, and culture in order to maintain historical accuracy. The mural committee would very much like to begin this project as soon as possible, so a quick response from interested artists would be appreciated. Please contact Nigel Rudolph (snrudolph@usf.edu) at the FPAN Central Regional Center @ Crystal River Preserve State Park  for any additional information. 

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Estuary Exploration: A Science Discovery Summer Camp

Estuary Exploration: 

A Science Discovery Summer Camp

GlassesGirl@ Crystal River Preserve State Park

June 16 – 20, 2014 / June 23 – 27, 2014

The Friends of Crystal River State Parks, in partnership with the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN), Florida Park Service, Florida Coastal Office, Crystal River Boat Builders, and Gulf Archaeology Research Institute (GARI), is offering exciting new archaeology and biology summer camps at Crystal River Preserve State Park designed for students who are interested in applying archaeology and biology to explore the Parks within Crystal River. All camp activities are conducted by professional archaeologists and biologists, including educators from FPAN, and allow kids to experience archaeology and biology first-hand through activities, experiments, hikes, and even an archaeological excavation.

TrowlBoy                           Dates:

June 16 – 20, 2014 (8:30 am – 4:30 pm)

June 23 – 27, 2014 (8:30 am – 4:30 pm)

Ages: Children ages 7 – 12

Registration: $70.00/camper/week

Registration is on a first-come, first-served basis. Limited to 20 campers per week.

Estuary Expedition Summer Camp 

This summer camp is designed for children with a strong interest in prehistory and the natural environment, as well as learning how early people interacted with their environment. Campers will learn about the importance of archaeology and will gain understanding about early natural resources that were necessary for life in the Crystal River area. Highlights of the camp include guest experts, tour of an archaeological site, hands-on archaeology, lab analysis, biological analysis expeditions in the park, atlatl adventure, and earning the certificate of Tommy the Tortoise, Junior Archaeologist.

How to Register

Complete registration and liability release forms are provided on the next page. Return via U.S. Postal Service along with a check or money order made out to “Friends of Crystal River State Parks” for the appropriate amount. We cannot accept cash or credit cards. Once the completed paperwork and payment have been received, we will provide a confirmation email along with other important information.

CLICK HERE FOR REGISTRATION FORM

Mailing Address

FPAN Central Regional Center

ATTN: Summer Camp

3266 N. Sailboat Avenue

Crystal River, FL 34428

Cancellation Policy

All cancellation requests must be received in writing or email and be postmarked no later than May 30th, 2014. No refunds will be made for cancellations received after that date. A $25.00 cancellation fee will be charged for all processed refunds.

For more information, or to register, please contact:

Nigel Rudolph

Office: (352) 795-0208

Email:  snrudolph@usf.edu

 

Junior Archaeologist and Florida State Parks Summer Camp

by Jason D. Moser

The Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN) is pleased to announce the 2013 Junior Archaeologist and Florida State Parks Summer Camp at the Crystal River Preserve State Park. This year FPAN is collaborating with staff and volunteers from the Crystal River State Parks and the St. Martins Marsh and Big Bend Seagrasses Aquatic Preserve to offer two, one-week-long Summer Camp programs. The summer camps will introduce 7 to 11 year olds to a variety of interdisciplinary programs which will engage and educate Citrus County’s youth about archaeology, history, wildlife ecology, social responsibility, and respect for nature in a fun environment. Many of these educational programs fulfill Florida’s Sunshine State Standards for education.

Boat-building 101

Junior archaeologists will be introduced to the field of archaeology through a week-long program of tours, activities and games with archaeologists, park and aquatic preserve staff. During a tour of the Crystal River Archaeological State Park campers will be introduced to the prehistory of the region and learn about what it takes to be an archaeologist. They will participate in a wide variety of activities designed to explore the many different skills practiced by prehistoric people. They will learn about the technology of Florida’s prehistoric people such as making pottery and learning about the tools and weapons of ancient Floridians. They will learn about how archaeologists use these artifacts to understand the past.

Students will receive “hands-on” experience on a simulated archaeological excavation and participate in a field laboratory where they will learn information about the plants and animals used by the prehistoric people. Afterwards, they will assist University of South Florida (USF) archaeologists during field school excavations at the Crystal River site. Campers will be introduced to the importance of rivers and marshes in Florida while they learn about the regions watershed and its history. Our Campers will assist The Crystal River Boat Builders in the construction of a 1800s wood, sailing vessel. In this fashion they will be introduced to the different periods of human history in Citrus County, Florida. Finally, campers will learn about the Crystal River Preserve State Park and the importance of its ecology. They will participate in a guided exploration of the different ecosystems within the park. Campers will take tram rides out into the park to collect plants from different environments and then return to identify what they are. We will also take a boat tour on the Crystal River to view the habitats and wildlife that the Crystal River supports.

This year we are accepting twenty (20) applicants for each week. Camp hours are from 8:30 to 2:00 PM with a morning break for snacks and lunch. Campers need to bring their own bagged lunch and snacks. The camp is beginning to fill, so reserve your spot fast! Please call (352)795-0208 for more camp information.
The cost of this year’s camp will be $85.00 per camper per week (due at registration). If you are interested in having your child attend, please apply by May 28th, 2013. The first camp will run from June 3rd through the 7th and the second will run from June 10th through the 14th. Please contact Beth Blankenship, Bev Elliott or Jason Moser at 352-795-0208 or email us at blankenship@mail.usf.edu or jmoser1@usf.edu for more information. Applications will be available for download at http://flpublicarchaeology.org/crc/campRegistration.pdf.

The camp will be based out of Crystal River Preserve State Park
3266 N. Sailboat Avenue
Crystal River, FL 34428

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